Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription or Fee Access

Gaming for stress: Application of a commercially available biofeedback system for at-risk young adolescents

Matthew T. Fish, PhD

Abstract


This article provides a brief overview of a novel 4-week biofeedback program. The purpose of the Stress Suspension Program was to provide a community-engaged partnership to teach young adolescents with behavioral issues how to increase their stress resiliency through the prescription of a commercially available biofeedback system that recreational therapists can integrate into the clinical setting. Stress management programs that address areas of improvement are needed to ensure that young adolescents with behavioral issues have the necessary tools to improve their quality of life and educational experiences. Qualitative feedback gathered for the Stress Suspension Program indicated a positive impact on students’ resiliency and provided constructive feedback for future program improvements.


Keywords


biofeedback, at-risk youth, resiliency, stress, video games

Full Text:

PDF

References


National Institute of Mental Health: Any disorder among children. Available at https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/any-disorder-among-children.shtml. Updated 2017. Accessed July 7, 2017.

Merikangas KR, He J, Burstein M, et al.: Lifetime prevalence of mental disorders in US adolescents: Results from the national comorbidity study-adolescent supplement (NCS-A). J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010; 49(10): 980-989.

National Institute of Mental Health: Major depression among adolescents. Available at https://www-nimh-nih-gov.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/health/statistics/prevalence/major-depression-among-adolescents.shtml. Updated 2017. Accessed June 26, 2017.

National Institute of Mental Health: Use of mental health services and treatment among children. Available at https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/use-of-mental-health-services-and-treatment-among-children.shtml. Updated 2017. Accessed June 26, 2017.

National Center for Health Statistics: National health and nutrition examination survey. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/index.htm. Updated 2017. Accessed June 29, 2017.

Nickel C, Lahmann C, Tritt K, et al.: Stressed aggressive adolescents benefit from progressive muscle relaxation: A random, prospective, controlled trial. Stress Health. 2005; 21(3): 169-175.

Hashim HA, Hanafi Ahmad Yusof H: The effects of progressive muscle relaxation and autogenic relaxation on young soccer players' mood states. Asian J Sports Med. 2011; 2(2): 99-105.

Hartman D: Hypnotherapy in child psychiatry: The state of the art. J Heart Centered Ther. 2010; 13: 377-393.

Wisner BL, Jones B, Gwin D: School-based meditation practices for adolescents: A resource for strengthening self-regulation, emotional coping, and self-esteem. Children Schools. 2010; 32(3): 150-159.

Sibinga EMS, Kerrigan D, Stewart M, et al.: Mindfulness-based stress reduction for urban youth. J Altern Complement Med. 2011; 17(3): 213-218.

World Health Organization: World Health Statistics 2016: Monitoring Health for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 2016. Available at http://www.who.int/gho/publications/world_health_statistics/2016/en/. Accessed June 26, 2017.

Knox M, Lentini J, Cummings T, et al.: Game-based biofeedback for pediatric anxiety and depression. Mental Health Family Med. 2011; 8(3): 195-203.

Pop-Jordanova N, Gucev Z: Game-based peripheral biofeedback for stress assessment in children: Peripheral biofeedback and stress. Pediatr Int. 2010; 52(3): 428-431.

Peek CJ: A primer in traditional biofeedback instrumentation. In Andrasik F, Schwartz M (eds.): Biofeedback. 4th ed. New York, NY: Guilford Publications Inc., 2016: 35-67.

Biofeedback certification international alliance. Available at http://www.bcia.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1. Updated 2017. Accessed July 7, 2017.

NeuroSky. Available at http://neurosky.com/. Updated 2017. Accessed July 7, 2017.

Pip. Available at https://thepip.com/en-us/. Updated 2017. Accessed July 7, 2017.

Azumio. Available at http://www.azumio.com/. Updated 2017. Accessed July 7, 2017.

Tan G, Shaffer F, Lyle R, et al.: Evidence-Based Practice in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback. 3rd ed. Wheat Ridge, CO: AAPB, 2016.

Moncada ME, de la Cruz J: Electrodermal activity—A review. Ingeniería e Investigación. 2011, 31(2): 143-151.

Dillon A, Kelly M, Robertson IH, et al.: Smartphone applications utilizing biofeedback can aid stress reduction. Front Psychol. 2016; 7: 832.

Peeters F, Oehlen M, Ronner J, et al.: Neurofeedback as a treatment for major depressive disorder—A pilot study. PLoS One. 2014; 9(3): e91837.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajrt.2018.0153

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.
This site uses cookies to maintain session information critical to the user's experience and environment on this system. Click "Accept Cookies" to continue.
For more details please visit our privacy statement at: Privacy & GDPR