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Bibliotherapy as a recreational therapy intervention in pediatric oncology

Dawn DeVries, DHA, DFRT, CTRS, Brenna Gallagher, CTRS, Kaitlin Harbin, CTRS, Jenny Schout, CTRS, Claire Schafer, CTRS, SKLD, Victoria TerAvest, CTRS

Abstract


Objective: To examine the literature, facilitate understanding of the intervention and contribute to the evidence-based practice on the use of bibliotherapy with children who have cancer to facilitate coping skills for anxiety.

Methods: A literature review was conducted to examine the practice of bibliotherapy when used with children who have cancer and implications for recreational therapy practice were developed.

Results: While the research on bibliotherapy is limited in recreational therapy literature, there is evidence that it can reduce anxiety and facilitate coping skills for children living with cancer.


Keywords


bibliotherapy, oncology, pediatric, recreational therapist, coping, anxiety

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajrt.2019.0193

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