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Hospital-based disaster preparedness for pediatric patients: How to design a realistic set of drill victims

Shana Ballow, DO, Solomon Behar, MD, Ilene Claudius, MD, Kathleen Stevenson, RN, Robert Neches, PhD, Jeffrey S. Upperman, MD, FAAP, FACS

Abstract


Objective: The purpose of this report is to describe an innovative idea for hospital pediatric victim disaster planning.
Design: This is a descriptive manuscript outlining an innovative approach to exercise planning.
Setting: All hospitals.
Patients: In this report, we describe a model set of patients for pediatric disaster simulation.
Results: An epidemiologically based set of mock victims.
Conclusions: We believe that by enhancing pediatric disaster simulation exercises, hospital personnel and decision makers will be better prepared for an actual disaster event involving pediatric victims.


Keywords


pediatric disaster preparedness, trauma, simulations, pediatric trauma

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2008.0024

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