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Developing a comprehensive, integrated and meaningful Multi-year Training and Exercise Plan

Ralph Renger, PhD, MEP, Brenda Granillo, MS

Abstract


A Multi-year Training and Exercise Plan (MYTEP) is required for compliance with the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP). The MYTEP is an important tool to a) assist agencies to identify the capabilities necessary for effective preparation, mitigation, response, and recovery and b) develop a training and exercise schedule to meet this need. Federal guidance in completing the MYTEP focuses on the following three key elements: applying the HSEEP building block approach, capability-based planning, and the cycle of continual improvement. The guidance is helpful but requires thoughtful consideration of the interplay between these elements. This article discusses many challenges and solutions for designing an integrated MYTEP including: a) the extent to which the agency goal is to build agency-level or human-level capability, b) the need to address cross-cutting capabilities in resource scarce environments, c) building and maintaining necessary core capabilities, and d) integrating sponsor-required exercises. The application of these concepts is then illustrated using a case example where a MYTEP was designed with a tribal Office of Emergency Management.

Keywords


multiyear, training and exercise plan, MYTEP

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5055/jem.2012.0115

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