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Addressing emergency response provider fatigue in emergency response preparedness, management, policy making, and research

Clark J. Lee, JD

Abstract


Fatigue in emergency response providers can compromise the effectiveness of any emergency response operation. Appropriate emergency response preparedness, management, policy making, and research efforts can mitigate the dangers posed by responder fatigue. This article focuses on the need for developing and implementing such efforts nationwide and considers existing resources, opportunities, and challenges for accomplishing this goal.

Keywords


fatigue, management, policy making, preparedness, research, responder

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5055/jem.2011.0070

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